Splitting Hairs

Today’s post is pretty random, sort of a rant, and parts might be a little TMI.

For most of my life, I have had long hair. There have been a few times that I’ve chopped it off and then swiftly decided to grow it out again. I love my long hair. Most of the time.

There is a very (very) fine line between long hair and too long hair. At least, there is for me. Has anyone else experienced this?

Long hair is beautiful. You can style it in a variety of different ways. Too long hair limits what you can do, because there’s too much of it. For example: I can easily French braid long hair and then tuck the end underneath the braid to get it up off my neck. When it’s too long, the weight of the braid pulls it out no matter how many bobby pins I use. Too long hair tangles underneath when you wear it down, leaving matted sections that are a nightmare (and painful) to get out.

There are other downsides to having long hair, such as the futility of vacuuming the bathroom because you know it’s just going to end up with hair all over the next time you brush your hair. And let’s not get started on the hairballs in the shower…

I don’t remember facing these challenges when I was younger and had hair down to there. Mom, if that’s because you were the one taking care of it, I’m sorry. It’s time to listen to the annoyance and schedule a haircut. Not to chop it off, but to bring it to the right side of that little line.

HR word vomit

From: Mom
To: Leah and Lindsey

Leah,

Good news and bad news regarding your coverage post graduation.

The good news is that currently our insurance will cover all unmarried children up to age 25 with no full-time student status required. The bad news is that my company hired me to bring all our benefits in-house and we have this insurance through a PEO. I don’t know what coverage we’ll have at time that you graduate.

Lindsey, what happened when you were on my old company’s benefits? I thought you lost your coverage on the first of the month following graduation. What does your company do? Is there a standard for the industry?
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From: Lindsey
To: Mom and Leah

For my company: to make this easy to apply, assume Leah was a dependent of one of our employees and that she graduated in May. She would be covered through the end of May and would receive information on COBRA continuation coverage in the mail. Dependents are eligible for 36 months of COBRA.

As far as I know, Mom’s old company covered me through the end of May but they never sent me COBRA information. I received a certificate of credible coverage which means I was cancelled, but they never sent me COBRA information. I should nail their butts for it too, especially if there was a 63-day gap in my coverage from them to my new insurance because that means I can’t waive my pre-existing conditions waiting period. I haven’t actually pulled out my COCC so I’m not sure…but that’s just me ranting because Mom’s old company sucks.

Legally, you have to be offered 36 months of COBRA, but I don’t know if that is one of the laws that applies to businesses of a certain size – Mom do you know? But COBRA is really expensive so I don’t know if you actually want to pay for it.
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From: Mom
To: Leah and Lindsey

Yeah, yeah, yeah. If I’m too specific, the PEO encrypts their e-mails and that’s such a hassle! Stupid HIPAA!

Actually, I have to defend my old company even though it kills me; it’s the insurance company that sends out COBRA notices, but then we know that they suck too.

Referencing my HRCI SHRM Learning System books which I keep as a handy desk reference…(I saw that eyeball roll, Lindsey!) employees are not required to provide healthcare benefits for their employees but employers who do and who employ more than 20 people must comply with COBRA. The length of time that the continuation coverage must be provided is determined by the reason for termination or qualifying event (also can be determined by state or local law). As you stated, dependent child loses eligibility is 36 months. So the bottom line is, regardless of the plan my new company chooses at the end of the year, Leah will be eligible for at least 36 months of COBRA unless I can find a plan that provides coverage without requiring full-time student status. Can we say, “conflict of interest”?
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From: Leah
To: Mom and Lindsey

Ummmmm….. A HIPPA NAMED SHRM HAS A PET COBRA???? ………Okay, I think I might be on to this now…..
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From: Mom
To: Leah and Lindsey

LOL OMG I’m snorting!!!! The people in the office next to me might need to administer oxygen!!!!!
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From: Leah
To: Mom and Lindsey

Haha!!!! Sweet! I’ll file that joke under: SNORT “So Nuts Oxygen is Required Timely”
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From: Lindsey
To: Mom and Leah

OMG that is hilarious!! My sister is a freaking comic genius!

Mom, I think Leah is trying to join our exclusive acronym club.

Sorry Leah, for the HR word vomit…but I can’t wait to see what you’ll do with that one!!